Say “no way” to BPA!

24 08 2009

There has been some media attention recently regarding aluminum water bottles and their link to the chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA). BPA is an endocrine disruptor and can mimic the body’s own hormones, which may lead to negative health effects if it is ingested in high doses. You may be aware that the chemical BPA is commonly used in disposable plastic bottles, plastic sports bottles and can also be found in the liners of aluminum cans and bottles.

On August 19th, 2009, aluminum bottle manufacturers Sigg and Laken acknowledged that bottles manufactured by their company prior to August, 2008 were knowingly lined with an epoxy-resin containing the harmful chemical BPA. At Green Bottle™, we feel stainless steel is a much better option than aluminum for food related consumer goods.

The benefits of a stainless steel bottles far outweighs those of aluminum bottles. While the properties of both metals can be safe for consumer products, aluminum tends to transfer taste and smells when used for liquid storage. Because of this, our competitors use a plastic lining to reduce the absorption of taste and smell from certain liquids. Typically this lining is plastic which may contain chemicals like BPA that have shown to leech into food or liquids.

We would like to take this time to reassure you that every Green Bottle™ is made of 18/8 #304 food grade stainless steel and has ALWAYS been 100% BPA free as clearly stated on all our packaging.

At Green Bottle™, we have always offered full transparency and have marketed our consumer products with honesty and integrity. We have published our quality assurance tests to the public and continue to test our consumer products on a monthly basis due to our high standards.

Many other bottle companies are responding to the news linking Sigg and Laken to BPA by expressing their concern for the consumer and singing the praises of their product. While we also believe our brand is better for the consumer, we’d like to do something more to improve this unfortunate situation. We want to put a stainless steel Green Bottle™ in your hand.

Buy any Green Bottle™ from our Green Bottle™ store as a replacement for your Sigg (or any other aluminum or plastic bottles) and get one Green Bottle™ free. This offer is valid until September 22, 2009 or until we have given away 100,000 Green Bottles. When you place your order, please use Special Offer Code – B1G1.





For your reading pleasure

22 07 2009

Interesting article from Yahoo! Health I thought I would share…

Imagine you’ve just been given a choice: You have to drink from one of two containers. One container is a cup from your own kitchen, and it contains a product that has passed strict state, federal and local guidelines for cleanliness and quality. Oh, and it’s free. The second container comes from a manufacturing plant somewhere, and its contents—while seemingly identical to your first choice—have not been subjected to the same strict national and local standards. It costs approximately four times more than gasoline. These products both look and taste nearly identical.

Which do you choose?

If you chose beverage A, congratulations: You just saved yourself a whole lot of money, and, perhaps, even contaminants, too. But if you picked beverage B, then you’ll be spending hundreds of unnecessary dollars on bottled water this year. Sure, bottled water is convenient, trendy, and may well be just as pure as what comes out of your tap. But it’s hardly a smart investment for your pocketbook, your body or our planet. Eat This, Not That! decided to take a closer look at what’s behind the pristine images and elegant-sounding names printed on those bottles.

You may actually be drinking tap water.
Case in point: Dasani, a Coca-Cola product. Despite its exotic-sounding name, Dasani is simply purified tap water that’s had minerals added back in. For example, if your Dasani water was bottled at the Coca-Cola Bottling Company in Philadelphia, you’re drinking Philly tap water. But it’s not the only brand of water that relies on city pipes to provide its product. About 25 percent of all bottled water is taken from municipal water sources, including Pepsi’s Aquafina.

Bottled water isn’t always pure.
Scan the labels of the leading brands and you see variations on the words “pure” and “natural” and “pristine” over and over again. And when a Cornell University marketing class studied consumer perceptions of bottled water, they found that people thought it was cleaner, with less bacteria. But that may not actually be true. For example, in a 4-year review that included the testing of 1,000 bottles of water, the Natural Resources Defense Council—one the country’s most ardent environmental crusaders—found that “about 22 percent of the brands we tested contained, in at least one sample, chemical contaminants at levels above strict state health limits.”

It’s not clear where the plastic container ends and the drink begins.
Turns out, when certain plastics are heated at a high temperature, chemicals from the plastics may leach into container’s contents. So there’s been a flurry of speculation recently as to whether the amounts of these chemicals are actually harmful, and whether this is even a concern when it comes to water bottles—which aren’t likely to be placed in boiling water or even a microwave. While the jury is still out on realistic health ramifications, it seems that, yes, small amounts of chemicals from PET water bottles such as antimony—a semi-metal that’s thought to be toxic in large doses—can accumulate the longer bottled water is stored in a hot environment. Which, of course, is probably a good reason to avoid storing bottled water in your garage for six months—or better yet, to just reach for tap instead.

Our country’s high demand for oil isn’t just due to long commutes.
Most water bottles are composed of a plastic called polyethylene terepthalate (PET). Now, to make PET, you need crude oil. Specifically, 17 million barrels of oil are used in the production of PET water bottles ever year, estimate University of Louisville scientists. No wonder the per ounce cost of bottled water rivals that of gasoline. What’s more, 86 percent of 30 billion PET water bottles sold annually are tossed in the trash, instead of being recycled, according to data from the Container Recycling Institute. That’s a lot of waste—waste that will outlive you, your children, and your children’s children. You see, PET bottles take 400 to 1000 years to degrade. Which begs the question: If our current rate of consumption continues, where will we put all of this discarded plastic?





New Bottles

30 06 2009

INTRODUCING…

Officially Licensed Collegiate Green Bottles!

Show your school spirit with our great new line of bottles featuring many Colleges and Universities!

GB CLC Sheet 2GB CLC Sheet 1

The Collegiate bottles should be here in September ’09! Please continue checking this blog for news and updates.





Something to think about

3 06 2009

Here is an interesting article from treehugger.com

A World of Reasons to Ditch Bottled Water  by Union of Concerned Scientists on 7.9.07 

Bottled water manufacturers’ encourage the perception that their products are purer and safer than tap water. Bottled water can cost up to 10,000 times more per gallon than tap water. But the reality is that tap water is actually held to more stringent quality standards than bottled water, and some brands of bottled water are just tap water in disguise. What’s more, our increasing consumption of bottled water—more than 22 gallons per U.S. citizen in 2004 according to the Earth Policy Institute—fuels an unsustainable industry that takes a heavy toll on the environment.

Approximately 1.5 million barrels of oil—enough to run 100,000 cars for a whole year—are used to make plastic water bottles, while transporting these bottles burns even more oil. The growth in bottled water production has increased water extraction in areas near bottling plants, leading to water shortages that affect nearby consumers and farmers. In addition to the millions of gallons of water used in the plastic-making process, two gallons of water are wasted in the purification process for every gallon that goes into the bottles. Nearly 90 percent of water bottles are not recycled and wind up in landfills where it takes thousands of years for the plastic to decompose.

So the next time you feel thirsty, forgo the bottle and turn to the tap. Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s standards for tap water are more stringent than the Food and Drug Administration’s standards for bottled water, you’ll be drinking water that is just as safe as, or safer than, bottled. If, however, you don’t like the taste of your tap water or are unsure of its quality, you can buy a filter pitcher or install an inexpensive faucet filter to remove trace chemicals and bacteria. If you will be away from home, fill a reusable bottle from your tap and refill it along the way; travel bottles with built-in filters are also available.

All the more reason to use your Green Bottle everyday!





Green Spring Cleaning

20 05 2009

Spring has sprung!  Unfortunately, along with spring also comes spring cleaning. This year, clean your home with products that are safe for the environment (and your wallet). It is not necessary to spend a lot of money on harsh, chemical cleaners. You can use simple, natural ingredients to make your home shine!

Three great ingredients to have on hand are lemons, baking soda and white vinegar.

Lemons are effective against many household bacteria. Baking soda is a great deodorizer and cleaner and wonderful for making a cleaning paste. Vinegar is a good grease cutter, mildew remover and all purpose cleaner.

-To easily clean your garbage disposal, cut half a lemon into pieces and run them through the disposal. The lemons will clean the disposal and leave your kitchen with a fresh scent!

-You can use household baking soda as a carpet deodorizer. Sprinkle it on your carpet before you vacuum for added freshness.

Do you have any natural cleaning tips you would like to share? Please leave them in the comments section. Thanks!

*Before applying any cleaning solutions, always spot test a small area if possible.





The Green Bottle Fundraiser Program

12 05 2009

Do you need to raise money for your school, sorority/fraternity, charity, sports team or group?  Are you looking for a refreshing alternative to pizza, wrapping paper, candy, cookie dough or other existing fundraisers? The Green Bottle fundraising program is for YOU! The Green Bottle is a profitable, healthy, reusable and eco-friendly product that your group will enjoy selling. The Green Bottle appeals to all ages and truly makes a difference in all of our lives.

Green Bottle offers you a substantial profit margin. With no up front investment, we will provide you with a customized fundraiser kit that will make your fundraiser truly effortless.

GreenBottles w-Water

We would be happy to help you set up a fundraiser. Please contact our fundraising department for more information at 1-866-974-6333 or email fundraising@puresimpleproducts.com

-J

*Green tip of the day: Conserve water by turning off your tap while brushing your teeth or shaving. You can save up to 8 gallons of water a day!





“No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow”

11 05 2009

Greetings from your friends at The Green Bottle! I’m Jess, your new blog master. We’ve been quite busy at the Green Bottle headquarters working on many exciting things!  I hope to be blogging quite frequently. Please continue to check The Green Bottle blog for announcements, contests, happenings and tips for living green.

Spring is here! Could there be a more perfect time to introduce some new Green Bottle designs? Please check them out. These new bottles are slated to arrive this week.

SellSheet - All 4-09 EMAIL

-J